How Do You Stop The Side Effects of Semaglutide? 
As Semaglutide can cause side effects in some people, we've decided to put together some information about the most common side effects, and what you can do to ease them.
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This content was reviewed and approved for its accuracy on 18/05/2021 by Professor Frank Joseph

Photograph of Professor Frank Joseph, weight loss expert for myBMI

How do you Stop the Side Effects of Semaglutide?

 

Semaglutide is the active ingredient in Wegovy injections, which can sometimes cause some unpleasant side effects at first.

 

Unfortunately, there’s no way of knowing if you’ll experience side effects until you try the medication, but there’s good news!

 

Even if you do experience side effects, there are often medications or remedies that can help to ease them.

 

In fact, if you are a myBMI patient and you do experience side effects that you need medication for, please contact us, as supporting treatments are included in the cost of your consultation.

 

We believe that you should receive as much support as possible to achieve your weight management goals, and at myBMI, treatments to help you to cope with side effects are part of the support that we offer.

 

If you’re wondering how you can stop Semaglutide side effects in the meantime, read on to find out what you can do!

 

Do side effects of Semaglutide go away? 

 

Most people that do experience side effects with Semaglutide say that they go away within a few weeks once the body has become used to the medication.

 

In order to reduce side effects as much as possible, you’ll be started on a low dose of Semaglutide and gradually increased up to a therapeutic dose.

 

However, some people still experience unpleasant symptoms from early on.

 

get rid of ozempic side effects

 

If you’re still struggling with side effects for a few weeks after you’ve reached the therapeutic dose, you should speak to your prescriber.

 

They may want to offer a supporting treatment, or may even suggest reducing your dose for a while until the side effects of Semaglutide wear off.

 

Even though you might feel a bit unpleasant when you first start taking Semaglutide, please remember that for most people, it isn’t permanent, and you should start to feel better as the weeks go on.

 

How long does it take to get used to Semaglutide?  

 

How long it takes to get used to Semaglutide can differ from person to person.

 

Some people never experience any adverse effects and will get used to the medication quickly, whilst others won’t be able to tolerate the medication at all and may need to switch to an alternative.

 

However, we would generally say to give it a few weeks after starting on the therapeutic dose (1.0mg weekly for Semaglutide injections) to see if the side effects go away.

 

If not, you should contact your prescriber to talk about your options, there are lots of weight loss medications out there, so don’t worry if this one just isn’t for you.

 

What are the side effects of Semaglutide?

 

Semaglutide side effects mostly involve the bowels and gut, due to the way it works in the body.

 

Because Semaglutide slows down the digestive process, it can cause gastrointestinal side effects that you might not be used to.

 

Some of the most common side effects of Semaglutide include:How 

Luckily, most of these side effects stop within a few weeks of taking Semaglutide, but they’re also fairly easy to treat whilst you’re waiting for your body to adjust to the treatment. 

 

Nausea and vomiting 

 

Nobody likes feeling or being sick, but unfortunately, new medicines can sometimes cause nausea and vomiting.

 

However, there are various things that you can do to try and reduce the sensation of feeling nauseous.

 

One of the most well-known remedies for nausea is ginger – with many people using ginger tea, cordials, or even ginger beer to make a bout of sickness disappear.

 

You should be able to find all of the above in most supermarkets, as well as fresh ginger root, which should be peeled before use.

 

If you find that you feel sick on Ozmepic after eating, then you may be eating too much.

 

One of the best things you can do in this situation is to eat smaller meals, and eat only as frequently as the medication allows but try to avoid long periods of fasting that can result in rebound hunger.

 

This should make sure that your stomach is never too full, but also that you shouldn’t feel hungry between meals.

 

Often, eating too much food can make us feel sick even without an appetite suppressant, so it’s even more important when taking Semaglutide to keep an eye on your portion sizes.

 

You should also make sure not to eat too close to bedtime, and not to be too active after eating a meal.

 

Try to let yourself digest your food before doing anything strenuous, as this can also contribute to nausea.

 

If you find that no home remedies help with your sickness, you should contact your myBMI prescriber, as they might be able to give you a supporting treatment to relieve nausea.

 

There are various medications available, such as Pepto Bismol or Buccastem, but if you need treatment, your prescriber will make sure that you receive something that’s safe for you to take.

 

Diarrhoea 

 

Diarrhoea happens to most people at some point in their lives, and whilst it can be painful, frustrating and embarrassing, it’s also treatable.

 

ozempic diarrhoea

 

Any bowel issues that you experience when you start taking Semaglutide should die down within a few weeks, but until then, you should try to eat more soluble fibre, as this can help to bulk out your poo by absorbing excess water.

 

It’s important to know the difference between soluble fibre and insoluble fibre, as whilst soluble fibre is great for diarrhoea, insoluble fibre is better for constipation – so you really don’t want to get the two mixed up!

 

Soluble fibre can be found in foods such as:side 

Many more examples of soluble fibre can be found online.

 

However, you should make sure that you aren’t eating too much fibre, as this can have the opposite effect and worsen your diarrhoea.

 

If you’re already eating plenty of fibre (and not too much), you may have to look at how to stop diarrhoea in other ways.

 

For example, if you’re losing a lot of fluid through diarrhoea, you may need to use oral rehydration sachets (similar to Dioralyte) in order to replace the lost minerals from your body.

 

You may also need to use these if you’ve been vomiting a lot.

 

To stop the diarrhoea, your prescriber might recommend that you take Loperamide – a medicine that helps to slow down the movement of food as it travels through your gut.

 

This helps your body to absorb more water from your stools, making your poo firmer.

 

This should reduce the frequency and urgency of needing to go to the toilet.

 

Acid reflux, indigestion and heartburn 

 

Although these conditions are different, the three terms are often used interchangeably due to the fact that they share similar symptoms and can often be treated in the same way.

 

Acid reflux is often felt in the chest or the back of the throat and can feel like a burning sensation.

 

A lot of people who suffer from it regularly find that their symptoms are often worse at night when lying down.

 

This is because your stomach acid is more likely to flow into the oesophagus than if you’re upright.

 

One way of relieving heartburn is to raise the head of your bed slightly and sleep in a reclined position rather than lying down flat.

 

This helps to keep any excess acid as far into your stomach as possible, and should hopefully reduce any irritation in your chest or throat.

 

If this doesn’t help, or you experience indigestion during the day, there are other things you can try, such as eating smaller portions or grazing throughout the day instead of having set mealtimes.

 

This might help to reduce the amount of food in your stomach, so it doesn’t have to produce as much acid to digest it.  

 

If you still find that you struggle with heartburn, please contact your prescriber, as they may be able to offer antacids or even a stronger medicine such as Omeprazole or Lansoprazole to help to ease your symptoms.

 

Constipation 

 

Constipation can be just as bad as diarrhoea, and often causes pain and discomfort.

 

Because Semaglutide slows down the digestive process, it means that food stays in your gut for longer, so your body absorbs more water from your poo.

 

This can mean that it becomes hard, dry and difficult to pass, causing constipation.

 

There are a range of things you can do to help constipation caused by Ozmepic, such as eating more insoluble fibre (found in almost all fruit and vegetables) and drinking more water in order to try and make your stools softer and easier to pass.

 

If adding more fibre to your diet doesn’t help to reduce constipation, you should contact myBMI and ask about any supporting treatments that you might be able to take.

 

There are various laxatives that are available to treat constipation, and they’re available in a range of different forms.

 

Your prescriber will have a discussion with you about which would be the best laxative for you to take.

 

In the meantime, you should be able to find Senna or alternative medicine at your nearest supermarket.

 

Bloating, gas and stomach cramps 

 

Although these three side effects aren’t all the same, they can often be treated in the same way.

 

All of the above symptoms are often caused by excess gas and can be incredibly painful to deal with at times.

 

ozempic gas

 

These are more issues that can sometimes be solved with eating smaller meals more frequently, as well as taking your time whilst eating and drinking.

 

Exercise can also help to relieve gas, as physical activity can help to move some of the gas that’s built up – though remember, it has to come out somehow!

 

You might experience flatulence or burping whilst trying to get rid of the built-up gas, so don’t be surprised if you choose to stretch out with some yoga and your sun salute gets a little windy!

 

Another thing you could try to get things moving is a gentle stomach massage.

 

Giving yourself a little tummy rub can help to move your stomach contents around a bit so that trapped gas can get to where it needs to go.

 

Try working in circular motions to help give that uncomfortable gas a little room to move.

 

If home methods such as the ones mentioned above don’t help to relieve your gas, you should contact us and ask your prescriber if there are any treatments that could help with your symptoms.

 

There are a range of medicines that are available to help relieve trapped wind, bloating and gas, but your prescriber will have a discussion with you about these and which one might be most suitable for you.

 

Are there side effects when you stop Semaglutide?

 

Semaglutide is not currently known to have any withdrawal symptoms when your treatment ends.

 

However, medication affects everyone differently, so if you’re worried about any side effects you experience when you come off Semaglutide, you should speak to your healthcare team.

 

They will be able to assess your condition and what may be causing your symptoms and will provide further treatment if you need it.

 

Although some people choose to stay on Semaglutide for a while after they reach their goal weight to help them with maintenance, others finish their treatment right away, and others may benefit from gradually reducing their dose over time.

 

Just like every other stage of your weight loss journey, how and when you stop Semaglutide will be unique to you, and your prescriber will be there to help you choose the best options.

 

 

Hopefully we’ve put your mind at ease as you begin your weight loss journey with Semaglutide, but if you’re still unsure we have much more information to share!

 

Our team have written lots of articles and advice pieces to help you with every stage of your weight loss journey, from your first pound lost, to working through plateaus, and how to maintain when you’ve hit your target weight.

 

So where do you start? Well, here are a few of our favourite articles that we think you’ll love.

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